Converting Blogger ATOM export to BlogML

Updated on Thursday, December 26, 2019

I'm slowly converting a number of blogs from Blogger to BlogEngine.NET. The least fun part is dealing with the Blogger export file. For this blog I used a Powershell script but had problems with comments not exporting correctly and it was quite painful to fix everything up. Blogger allows you to export a copy of your blog using ATOM, however BlogEngine.NET (and other tools) speak BlogML.

I've just released a command line tool that takes the ATOM format Blogger export and converts it to BlogML. You can download Blogger2BlogML from GitHub. The tool uses .NET 4.0 (client profile) so you'll need to install this if you don't already have it. If you give Blogger2BlogML a try let me know how you get on. 

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StackOverflow DevDays

Updated on Saturday, July 18, 2020

Fort Mason, San Francisco

Just got back from the StackOverflow DevDays event in San Francisco. I was a bit worried that this would be overly focused on marketing FogBugz and StackOverflow. There were brief pitches on each (and I learned that FogCreek is launching hosted source control and code reviews called Kiln, now in beta and looking pretty nifty with tight integration with FogBugz) but this wasn't the focus.

I was also a little concerned that I'd be the only one there without a StackOverflow profile t-shirt. Luckily I didn't see any reputation toting pod people at the conference.

Happily the day was very code oriented, and very diverse. Spell checking in Python, smartphone development for iPhone, Nokia (via Qt) and Android, ASP.NET MVC and jQuery. I spend most of my time at the moment in C#/.NET and it was really valuable to spend a day briefly diving into different stacks and platforms.

Joel said that they'd be back next year and I'm hoping that it offers a similar diverse range of topics.

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MessageInterceptor doesn't always...

Updated on Sunday, May 3, 2020

I've been writing a play by text message version of battleships for Windows Mobile 6 using the MessageInterceptor class to receive messages. This works great on my AT&T Tilt but completely fails on my wife's Pantech device. The MessageInterceptor hooks up fine but never fires.

The 2.0 compact framework SmsAccount lets you send messages but unaccountably doesn't let you read them.

I avoided some unpleasant interop by grabbing the MAPIdotnet library. This implements a NewMessage event for MAPI stores, however as with MessageInterceptor the event hooks up OK but never fires on the damned Pantech.

MAPIdotnet does allow you to read the SMS inbox though, so the final answer is to fall back to looking for, processing and then deleting game related text messages on a timer. This is far from ideal as the game messages arrive and vibrate the phone before getting processed but at least it's now possible to play without buying a new phone.

To add to the frustration during development the Visual Studio 2005 toolbox lost all icons except for the pointer and a custom control that was part of the project. Resetting the toolbox didn't help, nor did restarting VS and the computer. The fix was to exit VS and then delete all the .tbd files from Microsoft\VisualStudio\8.0 in local application data. Sigh.

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WiX Tricks for Screen Savers

Updated on Wednesday, May 5, 2021

I've been migrating my installers over to WiX. My only complaint with the WiX toolkit is that there's no bootstrapper included. This is important for installing any pre-requisites before passing control over to Windows Installer. Hopefully this will come after WiX 3.0 is released. For now, I've rolled my own bootstrapper to install .NET 2.0 if needed.

A couple of tips for screen savers. You can bring up the Windows screen saver settings using the following custom action. This is the same command that is launched when you right-click a screen saver (.scr) file and pick Install:

<CustomAction Id='InstallSS' Directory='SystemFolder' ExeCommand='rundll32.exe desk.cpl,InstallScreenSaver the.scr' Return='asyncNoWait'/>

Sequence this in InstallExecuteSequence after InstallFinalize:

You can also add a shortcut to your Program Files folder to configure the screen saver. This is really helpful for people who aren't sure how to get to the screen saver dialog from Control Panel or right-clicking the Desktop:

Unlike a shortcut to a file that you install you need to specify the Target. The example above assumes that ProgramMenuDir is the Id of your Start Menu folder. The shortcut should be in a Directory but not as a child of a File node.

Updated 2020-05-26 20:22:

It looks like something changed in Windows 10, around build 1903, that stops this from working on 64-bit systems. The screensaver will preview OK but does not start as expected (system screensavers start OK, so it's not some sort of power management problem). I could reproduce this on one box running 1909 but not another so maybe there is something else going on. The snippets above will run rundll32.exe from the SysWOW64 folder and at some point this seems to have stopped working. Changing to [System64Folder]rundll32.exe launches the System32 version which then causes the screensaver to load normally. If your screensaver is 32-bit and installed to SysWOW64 then you need a command that looks like this on a 64-bit system: [System64Folder]rundll32.exe desk.cpl,InstallScreenSaver [SystemFolder]the.scr

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