BadImageFormatException for a 64-bit ASP MVC web application

System.BadImageFormatException for a 64-bit web application in IIS Express

I converted an ASP.NET MVC web application to 64-bit in order to use dlib and it immediately died with a System.BadImageFormatException (Could not load file or assembly 'xxx' or one of its dependencies. An attempt was made to load a program with an incorrect format.)

Assuming I must have a stray wrong-bittedness something lying around I spent way to long with the assembly binding log viewer (Fuslogvw.exe) trying to figure out what I had messed up. But eventually I realized that Visual Studio was launching a 32-bit version of IIS Express to debug a 64-bit web application.

To fix this select Options from the Tools menu, expand Projects and Solutions, choose Web Projects and then check Use the 64-bit version of IIS Express for  web sites and projects. Problem solved.

(Probably shouldn't have this component in the web application - the plan longer term is to move it to an asynchronous process somewhere instead.)

Crushing PNGs in .NET

Updated on Sunday, September 30, 2018

Crushing PNGs in .NET

I'm working on page speed and Google PageSpeed Insights is telling me that my PNGs are just way too large. Sadly .NET does not provide any way to optimize PNG images so there is no easy fix - just unmanaged libraries and command line tools.

I have an allergy to manual processes so I've lashed up some code to automatically find and optimize PNGs in my App_Data folder using PNGCRUSH. I can call CrushAllImages() to fix up everything or CrushImage() when I need to fix up a specific PNG. Code below:

Minify and inline CSS for ASP.NET MVC

Updated on Tuesday, April 7, 2020

ASP.NET has a CssMinify class (and a JavaScript variant as well) designed for use in the bundling pipeline. But what if you want to have your CSS minified and inline? Here is an action that is working for me (rendered into a style tag on my _Layout.cshtml using @Html.Action("InlineCss", "Home")).

Note that I'm using this to inline CSS for this blog. The pages are cached so I'm not worried about how well this action performs. My blog is also basically all landing pages so I'm also not worried about caching a non-inline version for later use, I just drop all the CSS on every page.